A collection of podcasts exploring the culture in pop culture. Our shows range from the general (flagship show The Chronic Rift) to the specific (The Batcave Podcast). We look at literature (Dead Kitchen Radio), movies (The Weekly Podioplex), family (Generations Geek), gaming (The Cardboard Jungle), and more.

Categories

Public Access Show Episode
general
Mighty Movie Podcast
The Cinefantastique Spotlight
Presenting the Transcription Feature
Batcave Podcast
The Weekly Podioplex
The Cardboard Jungle
Cyborgs: A Bionic Podcast
The CFQ Interview
The Chronic Rift Spotlight
SciFi Diner Podcast
Generations Geek
Mighty Movie's Temple of Bad
G2V Podcast
The Chronic Rift In Review
HG World
It Has Come to My Attention
The Chronic Rift Roundtable
This and That With Him and Her
Dead Kitchen Radio
Doctor of the Dead
The Dan and Travis Show
The Dome
Watching the Skies
The HTD Express
Who's Talking
All Hail the Scream Queen
WCRS Radio Stage
Shazam/Isis Podcast
Marvel Cinematic Universe
The OSI Files
Home Game Show Version Podcast
Doctor Who & Mister Drew
The Chronic Rift Podcast
Guardian of Forever Podcast
The Hornet's Sting

Archives

2017
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2014
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2013
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2012
December
November
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2011
December
November
September
August
July
June
May
March
February

2010
December
April
March
February
January

2009
December
November
October
August
March
February
January

2008
December
November
October
September

September 2017
S M T W T F S
     
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Syndication

As promised last time, I’m giving you the first episode of the amateur detective drama “The Casebook of Gregory Hood,” a summer replacement series that became a hit in its own right.  Written by science fiction and mystery writer Anthony Boucher and writer Denis Green, it takes full advantage of its post-war San Francisco setting.  Then on the “Jack Benny Program,” Jack has to sneak around in order to avoid being seen by actor Ronald Colman.  Luckily, he has his old-lady costume from a production of “Charley’s Aunt.”  So on go the bonnet and high heels . . 

 

Episodes

 

The Casebook of Gregory Hood

June 3, 1946

“The Three Silver Pesos”

4:00

 

The Jack Benny Program

April 25, 1948

“Charley’s Aunt”

36:22

Comments[0]

To celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, we present an episode of “The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes” set on the Emerald Island.  Today, kissing the Blarney Stone is must-do for tourists.  Back in Queen Victoria’s time, the tradition was less-known and a lot more dangerous - as the Great Detective and the Good Doctor are about to learn.  Then we double-dip into classic Americana with two episodes of “Vic and Sade.”  First Vic is requested to tackle some ballistic golf clubs, and then he receives a top honor in the world of kitchenware.

 

Episodes

 

The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

March 18, 1946

“The Adventure of the Blarney Stone”

6:03

 

Vic and Sade

April, 1941

“40 Lbs of Golf Clubs”

38:02

 

May 2, 1941

“Vic’s Picture on Quarterly Cover”

47:32

Comments[0]

It’s a Presidents’ Day episode of “Presenting the Transcription Feature.”  On “Meet Me at Parky’s,” Greek restaurateur Parkyakarkus celebrates Abraham Lincoln’s Birthday.  He wants to do the Great Rail Splitter proud, but keeps having trouble with his decorating scheme.  Then on “The Great Gildersleeve” Gildy finds himself in a George Washington’s birthday bind.  He’s trying to set a good example for his nephew by not telling any lies, but reality keeps getting in the way.

 

Episodes

 

Meet Me at Parky’s

February 9, 1947

“Lincoln’s Birthday Decorations”

5:37

 

 

The Great Gildersleeve

February 22, 1942

“Selling the Drugstore”

39:13

Comments[0]

On “Dragnet” Friday and Smith find themselves investigating a locked-room mystery with an apparent suicide that just doesn’t add up.  Then Groucho Marx runs contestants through their paces on “You Bet Your Life.”  Parlez-vous français?  Grouch does.  Or does he, when one of the players is a young lady from the French consulate.

 

Episodes

Dragnet

“The Big Bible”

September 29, 1954 

1:38

 

You Bet Your Life

“The Secret Word is Door”

March 1, 1950  

31:27

Comments[0]

Let’s start the new year off with some New Year’s-themed episodes.  First off, the stars of “Fibber McGee and Molly” are thrilled to be invited to the New Year’s Eve dance at the highfalutin Wistful Vista Country Club.  They’ll be mixing with “society so high your nose will bleed.”  Then jump forward a couple of days to the first episode of “Information Please” from 1939.  The panelists will be quizzed about the previous year’s events, and they’ll have to untangle a very tricky poem.

 

Episodes

 

Fibber McGee and Molly

“The New Year’s Dance”

December 30, 1952

1:50

 

Information Please

“Guests: Cornelia Otis Skinner and Erwin Edgar”

January 3, 1939

30:18

Comments[0]

For our second Christmas-themed episode this year, we move from Christmas into New Year’s.  We start off with Eve Arden in “Our Miss Brooks.”  It’s Christmas Eve, and Connie seems destined to spend it alone (if you don’t count her pathetic little Christmas tree), but what would a Christmas comedy be without a little miracle?  Then it’s time to “Meet Me at Parky’s,” where that congenial Greek restaurateur, Parky himself, will spend the end of December looking for tickets to the New Year’s Day Rose Bowl game in Pasadena.  If he can get any, that will be a miracle as well.

 

Episodes

 

Our Miss Brooks

"The Magic Christmas Tree"

December 19, 1948

2:34

 

Meet Me at Parky’s

“Rose Bowl Tickets”

December 7, 1947

34:34

Comments[0]

For our first Christmas-themed episode this year, we present the LUX RADIO THEATER adaptation of the Judy Garland classic, “Meet Me in St. Louis.”  This one-hour version drops the character of Agnes, but retains, in the roles they originated in the 1944 film, Judy Garland and Margaret O’Brien as sisters Esther and Tootie Smith, as well as Tom Drake as The Boy Next Door, John Truett.  And you get to hear Garland perform a few songs that have since become standards, “The Boy Next Door,” “The Trolley Song,” and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.”

 

Episodes

The Lux Radio Theater

“Meet Me in St. Louis”

December 2, 1946

3:35

Comments[0]

For Thanksgiving, we present two Turkey Day-themed comedies.  First up, on “The Jack Benny Show,” Mary reads a poem she wrote just for 1939.  From 1939 to 1941, Thanksgiving was celebrated not on the fourth Thursday of the month, but the third.  Then Jack wonders what’s going on when the turkey he bought lays an egg as big as a cantaloupe.  “The Great Gildersleeve” was always filled with topical laughs.  As Thanksgiving approaches, Gildy hopes to get a coveted “B Ration” gas card, nephew Leroy has to perform in the school Thanksgiving play, and it becomes harder and harder to actually find a turkey.

 

Episodes 

The Jack Benny Show

“Jack Discovers He Has Purchased an Ostrich for Thanksgiving Dinner”

November 19, 1939

4:29

 

The Great Gildersleeve

“Thanksgiving Dinner”

November 22, 1942

38:21

Comments[0]

 

With the World Series almost upon us, we thought we’d give you a tale of baseball that culminates at the World Series.  “The Lux Radio Theater” brought listeners abridged versions of popular films of the day.  This time it’s “It Happens Every Spring,” with Ray Miland reprising the role he created in the 1949 film of the same name.  Miland plays a mild-mannered college professor who stumbles up on wood repellent.  When secretly applied to baseballs, it makes him a pitcher that no one can hit.  Play ball!

The Lux Radio Theater

“It Happens Every Spring”

October 3, 1949

4:55

Comments[0]

We think of Ray Bradbury as a fantasist or a science fiction writer.  But he was equally adept at crime drama.  One of his first sales was “Killer Come Back to Me” to Detective Tales in July of 1944.  Less than two years later, it was adapted for the radio by the “Molle Mystery Theatre.” This hard-boiled noir tale of killers, dames, and stolen identities takes a number of clever twists and turns.  But does crime ever pay?  Then on “Meet Me At Parky’s,” everyone’s favorite Greek restauranteur decides to help out with a teacher shortage.  He may be known for his malapropisms in English, but if he’s going to teach his native Greek nothing could possibly go wrong, right?

 

Episodes

 

Molle Mystery Theatre 

“Killer Come Back to Me”

May 17, 1946

3:23

 

Meet Me At Parky’s

“Teachers Wanted”

November 10, 1946

35:58

Comments[0]